Posts Tagged ‘buildings’

York Looks For Time In All The Right Places

June 23, 2010

What's The Time Now?

Not too long ago, before the ubiquity of cell phones, PDAs, computers, wrist watches, pocket watches, and clocks of all sorts, the church was an important part of telling the time. This beautiful church clock tower that York Restoration Corporation walked by more than a few days ago probably was once relied upon to tell lots of people the time. Lovely!

Though it’s important to be on time, York wouldn’t mind avoiding the tether of cell phones, wrist watches, and other time-tellers. It’s nice to lose yourself and lose track of time while on a walk, as York did on its last stroll through Manhattan, only to be greatfully reminded of the hour by the happenstance of a church.

Ah well. Perhaps York Restoration Corporation was built for a different era. But then again, older eras didn’t have power grouters and Sawsalls!

A fountain for York

June 21, 2010

York's fountain of love

What is it about fountains’ promise of incidental mist that draws York Restoration Corporation like ants to dryrotted wood? Relief? Cool, clean water? Maybe the ambient relaxation that comes from watching kids splash and New Yorkers’ faces transform from rictuses of low-level irritation or frustration into relative relaxation or even the occasional smile?

We forget so often how this city seems to add up on you, build up inside you like the radiation from a long-ago meltdown; our city’s Chernobyl never happened, but somehow happens every day.

York spent a good hour sitting, alternating reading an old book with unabashed looking. Watching. Staring out at the fountain and everyone who played in and around it. We occasionally stumble across these areas that stress forgot, where the over-exposed film of everyday life pulls back its harsh whites and grays and grants us a few moments of shade, a cooling mist, and the seemingly distant laughter of kids being kids. Far away, the city continued on without us.

York Restoration Corp. Visits The Church Of Saint Joseph

June 18, 2010

York Restoration Corporation Image

Just in case you weren’t tired of churches, yet!

This is the Church of St. Joseph, a very clean and neat church in Greenwich Village. The church was opened in 1924, and has since (of course)  gone under a number of renovations.

Not the least of which was adding a beautiful, wonderful, amazing organ! If you’ve a chance to sit in on a service… DO! That organ could bring tears to a dead man.

We usually think of churches as these dim areas with faded, worn stone edifices; quiet things filled with whispers and old books. This iteration of St. Joe’s is bright and cheerful with happy lines and colorful windows! We like the change-up, here! York was surprised to find, after a little reflection, that this church appealed to our aesthetic senses.

Does it yours? Leave us a comment!

This post brought to you by York Restoration Corporation

The Big Brick Building And York

June 16, 2010

York Restoration Corporation Image

Somehow, this big, brick sore thumb stuck out and, yet, felt right at home.

It’s the age. It’s gotta be the age. It looks as if it’s been there for years and years, and somehow been grandfathered in to looking “right” in the neighborhood.

York Restoration Corporation would like to think that, like how people start to look like their pets (or vice versa), that the building’s residents have the same sort of odd draw that the building does. Or maybe, the building took on its residents’ esoteric ways? Who knows!

It’s our imagination!

A Nice Church Spotted By York Restoration Corporation Near NYU

June 15, 2010

Church Image From York Restoration Corporation

So many beautiful churches in Manhattan. This one’s down by NYU, where York was walking around last week.

York Restoration Corporation hasn’t had a chance to restore many churches yet, and it’s a shame. We’d love to show off our one-of-a-kind restoration skills on such an important, permanent stage.

Some day. It’ll happen, we know it. Until then, we’ll keep enjoying these churches, cathedrals, and monasteries from afar, secretly rebuilding and restoring them in our minds.

Church Image By York Restoration Corporation

York Restoration Corporation Image

Red, Brown And York Restoration Corporation

June 14, 2010

York Restoration ImageYork Restoration Corporation Image

You know?

York Restoration Corporation‘s looking over these two photos, and we can’t remember why we took them. I mean, there’s the color scheme, which I guess is pretty ok, and there’s the storefronts, which remind me that we need to get a Nintendo Wii for the office, but other than that?

I can’t recall.

Sorry everyone!

Every Restoration Corporation Enjoys New York’s Met Building

June 9, 2010

York Restoration Corporation shot of Metlife

This giant, foreboding wall of windows is one face of the gigantic MetLife building (nee Pan Am Building), located slightly above and behind Grand Central Station in central Manhattan.

Strangely enough, it’s not even owned by MetLife any longer. It’s owned by some group called Tishman Speyer Properties, which sounds more like a mom-and-pop apartment leasing venture than a group with the clout to buy an iconic Manhattan high-rise.

York Restoration Corporation is, sadly, not a huge fan. It reminds us of many of the generic Los Angeles sky scrapers, boxy and gray, boring and somewhat of an eye sore. All of that is multiplied, of course, by its location behind Grand Central. It stands out, (somehow gaudily) despite its generic ugliness, a throwback to the utilitarian, almost Modernist, late 60s/early 70s high rise architecture that dominated the day.

Ah well. It is very popular with tenants, supposedly, probably because of its central location and attachment to Grand Central.

Maybe someday we’ll see a replacement, but it’s highly doubtful. The MetLife building is probably here to stay.

A Roof Most Restoration Companies Would Love to Hate

June 8, 2010

Restoration Corporations Admiring a beautiful roof

Wow. That’s… one heck of a roof there.

The restoration corporation involved with that roof would have a bit of a logistical headache on its hands. Nothing impossible, of course, but time-consuming.

But, the chance to work on something that intricate and historic! It’d be a joy to loath that job.

Working on old churches is a personal favorite. I can’t quite shake my Catholic upbringing; standing in a century (or centuries) – old cathedral brings a sense of calm to the job. There’s a smell to it – candle wax, stain for the pews, the must of old books – that reminds me of youth, of being young and cared for, meals taken care of, Nickelodeon back when Nick At Night ruled the evening, and frozen pizzas.

Well, some things stay the same.

There’s an old comfort to old things. It’s nice to be reminded of that now and again.

Seeing Green With York Restoration Corporation

June 7, 2010

Seeing Green York Restorations Corporation

My old friend, Frank Lloyd Wright, once remarked as we were enjoying a spot of tea in Arizona, the setting sun splashing red all over the painted landscape around us: “Doctors bury their mistakes. Architects cover them.”

Not always, old friend!

Sometimes, adding a bit of green can add some excitement to the plodding sameness of an area or, especially if the ivy’s allowed to grow and spread, add some consistency to a desultory progression of architecture.

Dangers exist.

If your stucco or brick isn’t sound; if your cement and lime sealant isn’t true and pure, that creeping ivy can (and usually will) find its way in the imperfection(s) and start to cause hell in your wall. Newer structures, for the most part, don’t have to worry about this.

Wooden structures, it seems, inevitably fall to the creeping insistence of ivy. Whether it’s imperfections in the grain (ivy will force its way in the grain and then break apart the board from the inside, causing dry/wet rot), tearing apart seams (ivy will grow in-between the boards and grow… and grow… until the boards are suddenly cockeyed and unstable), or sheer weight (ivy grows until it weighs enough to collapse the structure), ivy’s been known to literally tear apart wooden structures.

But don’t let that get you down! Ivy, like a good dog, just needs to be trained. With a little effort and a month-to-month check-up, you can make sure your ivy’s going where it needs to go. It requires a little patience, but ivy can and will grow to cover just about any surface you train it to.

Give ivy a shot; just make sure your structures are sound, your surfaces are tight, and your schedule allows for a little oversight. Your building can look like Wrigley Field’s walls in no time!

This post brought to you by York Restoration Corporation

York Restoration Corporation Grooves on a Classic Building

June 4, 2010

York Restoration Corporation

Mmm. That top floor. Creepy, right? Like something from Hitchcock’s classic, “Psycho.” Looks like there ought to be the faint outline of a cross-dressing, murderous, hotel-running Anthony Perkins looking out onto the street.

Not to denigrate the building! It’s a classic building. You know it’s solid, if a little dingy, and probably filled to its rafters with locals who’ve lived in the same apartment for 32 years. They who nod in the hall as they pass one another, occasionally share exciting family news, live with two cats and a cockatoo, eat too much salt, hoard the razor-thin ovals of nearly used-up soap bars inside a plastic bag under the sink so that, a few months and many bars of soap later, those little leftover soap slivers can be packed together to form a “new” Voltron soap bar.

This building says, “buy local.”

“Never try to lift more than you weigh.”

“Cut up all but one of your credit cards, then put that last credit card in a shallow bowl of water. Stick that in the freezer. Whenever you get the urge to buy, pull it out and wait for it to melt. Chances are, the urge to buy will’ve subsided by the time it’s completely unfrozen. Win!”

“Take your date for a walk and a picnic in the park rather than dinner and a movie. Unless you can’t hold a conversation. In that case, always suggest movies. If all else fails, ask a lot of questions and pray you’re attractive.”

Yes, I’d take that sensible building. If it were a woman, and I were dating, I’d have no qualms about taking her home to mother (so long as she cleaned up a bit beforehand.)

And she weren’t the female Anthony Perkins.